Wordsmith Studio Weekly Photo Prompt- Out the Window!

If you guys haven’t been over to WordsmithStudio.org to see the latest photo prompt, go now! Here is my contribution for your viewing pleasure.

I took this photo through the windshield as we were driving down the road. It was sprinkling a little and you can see the drops as blurry spots.

I took this photo through the windshield as we were driving down the road. It was sprinkling a little and you can see the drops as blurry spots.

Why don’t you join me in some photo fun? Take a window shot of your own and link to it over in the comments at WordsmithStudio.org. I’d love to see what you get.

Also there is a new craft article (written by yours truly) on shutter speed over there. Check it out, you might learn something. Or, even better, leave a comment and teach me something. :P

Becca♥

Photography Craft: Shutter Speed

Welcome Wordsmiths! This week, we will be exploring shutter speed in more detail.

Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is the measurement used to indicate the amount of time that the camera’s sensor is exposed to the light from your scene that will become the image. It is measured in seconds but it will usually be a fraction of a second. Shutter speed is most commonly used to affect two things: exposure and motion blur. 

Exposure

As we discussed a few weeks ago, shutter speed is one of three factors affecting the exposure of a particular image. You can change the shutter speed on your camera to allow more or less light to reach the sensor depending on your needs. When you change your shutter speed for this reason, it’s to compensate for too much/too little light reaching your sensor due to the amount of available light when you take your picture.

Night photography is a great example for both instances, depending on what you want to photograph. In order to photograph stars, you will need to manually increase the shutter speed and expose the camera’s sensor to the starlight for a longer period, since there is so little of it. If you want to photograph a full moon, however, there is much more light available. So, to keep from getting just a big white blur, you will need to decrease the shutter speed you use.   

Motion Blur

When your camera’s sensor is exposed (the shutter is open), it collects all the available light. So if something in your frame moves, the sensor gets the light from all the object’s positions, causing blur. Sometimes this looks cool and sometimes it is less desirable. There are a few places I like a little motion blur: waterfalls, hummingbirds, and sometimes to show action.  

Shutter speeds are 1/800th of a second and 1/2 second, respectively.

Here are some photos I took of Black Fork Falls at Twin Falls State Park in WV. For the first one, I left the camera on auto. It chose a shutter speed of 1/800th of a second. The fast shutter speed froze the water as it fell. For the second one, I decreased the shutter speed to 1/2 of a second. You can see that the water is blurred as it falls because the sensor records the light from the water through a half-second of movement. 

Most cameras have a setting for shutter speed priority. On my DSLR, it’s designated by Tv, and this is what I used to take the second photo above. This means that you can manually set the shutter speed and your camera will automatically select the aperture and ISO to allow the ideal amount of light to reach the sensor. This is nice when you want to choose the shutter speed but you don’t want to go through a lot of trial and error trying to find the right settings for the other factors of exposure. 

Try This At Home

First thing you need to do: find your camera’s manual and learn how to adjust the shutter speed. If your camera has a shutter speed priority setting, figure out how to choose that. Then find something that’s moving to take a picture of. It could be a pet or a family member or cars driving down the road. You can even turn on your shower and photograph the water.

Take a photo using your auto setting and note the shutter speed the camera chose. Go to the shutter speed priority setting and take a picture at  a slower speed, and then a faster one. If your camera doesn’t have a shutter speed priority setting, you might have to change the aperture or ISO to compensate for the changes in exposure. Look at the differences in the three images. Which one is more appealing to you? Why? In my waterfall examples above, I like the image taken with the slower shutter speed because it looks more natural. In real life, you can’t pause the water to see individual drops. It all just blurs together as it pours over the edge of the fall.  Post your images on your website, blog, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, or whatever. Then, come back here and leave a link in the comments so we can see your photography prowess. 

Does this clear things up a bit (in your mind and your photos)? Do you still have questions? Be sure to ask, I’ll be responding to all comments. Or email us here. Got a photo tip? Let us know! We ♥LOVE♥ feedback here at Wordsmith Studio!! 

Go back and check out our earlier posts: Overview to Exposure and Aperture. And be sure to come back in two weeks for a more in-depth post on ISO and how it affects your photography.

Wordsmith Studio Weekly Photo Prompt- Shadows

If you guys haven’t been over to WordsmithStudio.org to see the latest photo prompt, go now! Here are my contributions for your viewing pleasure.

Why don’t you join me in some photo fun? Take a shadow shot of your own and link to it over at WordsmithStudio.org. I’d love to see what you get.

Also there is a craft article (written by yours truly) on aperture over there. Check it out, you might learn something. Or, even better leave a comment and teach me something. :P

Becca♥

Weekly Photo Challenge: Green

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Green

Check out some others’ green:

  1. Weekly Photo Challenge – Green | Tacts Blog
  2. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green (No 2) « Cambodia and Vietnam Photography
  3. Weekly Photo Challenge: Geekin’ it Green | rarasaur
  4. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Max510’s Blog
  5. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Just a few photos
  6. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | Angel Frouk
  7. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | Here & Abroad
  8. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Jinan Daily Photo
  9. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | Aphro Junkee
  10. WordPress challenge: Green | Anotherdayinparadise2’s Blog
  11. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | blueberriejournal
  12. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « From My Horizon
  13. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | The Good Villager
  14. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Something Unspoken
  15. Greenish hues | Artifacts and fictions
  16. What Could Be Green In November… « Eclipse Of The Moon
  17. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « My thought exactly…!
  18. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | My Sardinian Life
  19. LJ [whatever] Photo Challenge: Green « LJ.returns
  20. A Vision of Paradise | The Wanderlust Gene
  21. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Fitness, Food and Photography
  22. Weekly Photo Challenge: GREEN (Lasers) « A drifter off to see the world
  23. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | Photography Journal Blog
  24. Greenhouse, Pinoy-style « Fly for Icarus
  25. Weekly Photo Challenge : Green | Berbagi Kisahku
  26. Green, Green & More Green! « Zeebra Designs & Destinations
  27. Four continents, One green « Purnimodo
  28. grove « yi-ching lin photography
  29. Literally Green. « Luddy’s Lens
  30. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « warmhotchocolate
  31. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Life&Ink
  32. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | Milners Blog
  33. Weekly Photo Challenge : Green « Kisahku
  34. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Beijing Daily Photo 2
  35. Seven Reasons to Love Green « Stray Thoughts
  36. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Hurtled to 60 and Now Beyond…
  37. Industrial Zone: Green, Technically | Empire of Lights
  38. Illustrated ‘Bolivian-style’ adapted cooking: Green Bean Casserole! « 3rdculturechildren
  39. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Sandra’s scribbles
  40. weekly photo challenge: green « a nomad in the land of nizwa
  41. Weekly Photo Challenge: GREEN | Serendipity 13
  42. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green Gallery | Humbled Pie
  43. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Grandmother Musings
  44. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | belgradestreets
  45. WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: GREEN « MY WALL
  46. Weekly Photo Challenge:Green | perceptionsofareluctanthomemaker
  47. Determination « Broken Light: A Photography Collective
  48. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green | newsofthetimes
  49. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green (Ireland) « What’s (in) the picture?
  50. WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Lagottocattleya
  51. Weekly Photo Challenge: The Sparkle of Green | ♢ Mike Watson
  52. Wearin’ ON the Green « humanTriumphant
  53. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « Try 2B cool ‘n smart…
  54. Weekly Photo Challenge – Grün / Samstag, Filme « OceanPhoenix
  55. Weekly photo challenge: Green 2 « The (Urban-Wildlife) Interface
  56. Weekly Photo Challenge: Green « The Kindness Kronicles
  57. Green « Little Yaris Photo

Wordsmith Studio Weekly Photo Prompt- Jump Shot

If you guys haven’t been over to WordsmithStudio.org to see the latest photo prompt, go now! Here is my contribution for your viewing pleasure.

Why don’t you join me in some photo fun? Take a jump shot of your own and link to it over at WordsmithStudio.org. I’d love to see what you get.

Also there is a new craft article (written by yours truly) on aperture over there. Check it out, you might learn something. Or, even better leave a comment and teach me something. :P

Becca♥

Photography Craft: Aperture

Welcome Wordsmiths! This week, we will be exploring aperture in more detail.

Aperture

Aperture is the opening of the camera that allows light to enter and reach the sensor responsible for recording the image. It is measured in f/stops (f/#). The number in the aperture designation is inversely proportional to the size of the opening. Therefore, a lower f/#, like f/3.5, means that the aperture is wider open than a higher f/#, like f/22. Basically, aperture affects two things: the amount of light that reaches the sensor and the depth of field. 

Exposure

As we discussed a couple weeks ago, aperture is one of three factors affecting the exposure of a particular image. You can change the aperture on your camera to allow more or less light to reach the sensor depending on your needs. When you change your aperture for this reason, it is usually to compensate for too much/too little light reaching your sensor due to your choice of shutter speed and/or ISO. 

f/3.5

f/3.5

Depth of Field

Depth of field is usually the reason you will manually choose your aperture. Sometimes, you will want a very shallow depth of field. This means that there is a small range of distance from the sensor that appears in focus. Everything farther, or closer to the sensor will blur. This is useful for drawing attention to a very specific area of your image. The first example uses a large aperture, f/3.5, and the mat and close leaves are in focus, but the rail and hillside are not clear.

f/22

f/22

Sometimes you will want more of your image in focus. For example, if you are taking a picture of a person in front of an interesting background, you will want both the person and the background to be clear in the image. So you will manually choose a smaller aperture (larger f/#). The second example uses a smaller aperture, f/22, and the entire image is more in focus. You can clearly see the rail and the leaves on the hill.

Most cameras have a setting for aperture priority. On my DSLR, it’s designated by Av, and this is what I used to take the photos above. This means that you can manually set the aperture and your camera will automatically select the shutter speed to allow the ideal amount of light to reach the sensor. This is helpful when you want to choose the depth of field, but you don’t want to go through a lot of trial and error trying to find the right settings for the other factors of exposure. 

Try This At Home

First thing you need to do: find your camera’s manual and learn how to adjust the aperture. If your camera has an aperture priority setting, figure out how to choose that. Then find something you can get fairly close to while keeping the background farther away. Set your camera to the widest aperture available (smallest f/#), and take a picture. Then, set it to the narrowest aperture available (largest f/#), and take another picture. If your camera doesn’t have an aperture priority setting, you might have to change the shutter speed to compensate for the decrease in exposure due to the smaller aperture. Look at the difference in depth of field in the two images. Which one is more appealing to you? Why? In my examples above, I like the image taken with the wider aperture better because it draws attention to the leaves just behind the mat and the rail and messy hillside don’t distract as much when slightly out of focus. Post your images on your website, blog, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, or whatever. Then, come back here and leave a link in the comments so we can see your photography prowess. 

Does this clear things up a bit (in your mind and your photos)? Do you still have questions? Be sure to ask, I’ll be responding to all comments. We ♥LOVE♥ feedback here at Wordsmith Studio!! 

Be sure to come back in two weeks for a more in-depth post on shutter speed and how it affects your photography.

#WSStudioPic – Orange

Woo Hoo! A new weekly photo prompt! Wordsmith Studio will be posting a new prompt every Thursday! Today is the first one, and I’m super excited about it!!

Here’s my photo for “orange”!! This is one of my favorite trees in the fall. It is so much brighter than the other trees around my house. I got this photo right before all the snow came down from Hurricane Sandy.

Why don’t you join me in some photo fun? Take a pic of something that means “orange” to you!! Tag it with #WSStudioPic and link to it from the Wordsmith Studio prompt page. I can’t wait to see what all of you come up with.

 

♥ Becca

 

Take a Picture! – Orange

Wordsmith Studio’s Weekly Photo Prompt

Wordsmith Studio Logo BannerWelcome to Wordsmith Studio’s Weekly Photo Prompt!! Every Thursday we’ll post a new topic for your photographing pleasure.  8-) Go out into the world with this topic in mind and find some wonderful things to photograph. When you get a good one (or three, or five), post them on your blog, website, instagram, twitter, or whatever. So everyone can find your contribution, be sure to add the tag/hashtag/keyword: #WSStudioPic. Then come back and post a link to your photo(s) in the comments. It can relate to the theme in any way, as long as it relates! Surprise us!! 

This week’s theme is: Orange

Red and Yellow make Orange. ;)

In honor of our lovely orange logo!!

What does the word “orange” remind you of?

What comes to mind first: the fruit or the color? 

What does an orange taste like to you? Good or bad? Sweet or sour? Smooth or pulpy?

What are some things that are the color orange? Lots of autumn things like leaves and pumpkins are orange.

 

Take a Picture!

Go forth into the world and find some orange. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!!

Photo prompts are a great way to get the creative juices flowing. When you’re looking at the world with a particular idea in mind, like “orange”, you’ll find yourself seeing lots of orange things you’ve never noticed before. You’ll start seeing orange everywhere. And that’s fantastic! When you start looking, and seeing the world in new ways, you’ll come up with endless ideas. And if you’re a writer like all of us here at Wordsmith Studio, new and creative ideas are always welcome. :D

 

Got ideas?

Do you have suggestions for future “Take a Picture!!” posts? Leave a comment. We ♥LOVE♥ feedback!! 

 

Be sure to come back next week for more fun and new inspiration, and check out our photography group posts every other Monday. Also, watch for a collage of “orange” photos taken by our contributing members!!

 

Happy Snapping and Photo Fun!

Wordsmith Studio Photography Group